Get the data: Drone wars

Obama 2011 Pakistan strikes

Obama Zadari 2009 - Flickr

 President and Mrs Obama with Pakistan’s President Zardari, 2011 (Photo: White House)

The events detailed here occurred in 2011. These have been reported by US or Pakistani government, military and intelligence officials, and by credible media, academic and other sources, including on occasion Bureau researchers. Below is a summary of CIA drone strikes and casualty estimates for 2011. Please note that our data changes according to our current understanding of particular strikes. Below represents our present best estimate.

CIA strike – Obama 2011
Total CIA drone strikes 75
Total reported killed: 363-666
Civilians reported killed: 52-152
Children reported killed: 6-11
Total reported injured: 158-236


Click here for our 2013 Pakistan data set.

Click here for our 2012 Pakistan data set.

Click here for our 2010 Pakistan data set.

Click here for our 2009 Pakistan data set.

Click here for our the Bush years Pakistan data set.


January 2011 – March 2011 

Ob181 – January 1 2011
♦ 8-10 total killed
In the first of four linked strikes in North Waziristan, an early morning attack on a moving car and a house killed up to nine alleged militants, possibly connected to Hafiz Gul Bahadur (LA Times). A February 2012 report published by Associated Press, based on extensive interviews with locals, confirmed that 14 Taliban and no civilians died in this event and Ob182.

Location: Mandi Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, Express Tribune, Dawn, Dawn, Los Angeles Times, CNN, PakObsever, BBC News, The Nation, ABC Local, Al Jazeera English, Long War Journal, opednews.com, Al Jazeera English, Prison Planet, AP, Bureau

Ob182 – January 1 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
After waiting two hours with drones still overhead, rescuers reportedly attempted to retrieve the dead and injured from Ob181 but were attacked. Up to six people were killed, all militants according to the Bureau’s researchers in Waziristan. A February 2012 report published by Associated Press, based on extensive interviews with locals, confirmed that 14 Taliban and no civilians died in this event and Ob181. Four of the dead were local men according to a secret internal tally of drone strike casualties compiled by the local political authority and published by the Bureau in January 2014.

Location: Mandi Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, Express Tribune, Dawn, Dawn, Los Angeles Times, CNN, PakObsever, BBC News, The Nation, ABC Local, Al Jazeera English, Long War Journal, opednews.com, Al Jazeera English, Prison Planet, Jang (Urdu), AP, Bureau

Ob183 – January 1 2011
♦ 4-5 total killed
A car was attacked and up to five alleged militants killed in a strike confused by some outlets with Ob184. An internal Pakistani government record of drone strikes and casualties counted four dead in this strike that hit a car at 1740. ‘Uzbek militants were killed,’ according to the secret document that was published by the Bureau in January 2014.

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, Express Tribune, Long War Journal, CNN, PakObsever, The Nation, Truthdrive, Bureau

Ob184 – January 1 2011
♦ 4 total killed
♦ 4 injured
In the fourth related strike of the day another vehicle was struck, killing four alleged militants.

Location: Boya, Mohammad Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, Express Tribune, Long War Journal, PakObsever, Dawn, CNN, ABC Local, SATP

Ob185 – January 7 2011
♦ 1-6 total killed
♦ Civilian deaths possible
A house and at least one vehicle were attacked, killing up to six alleged militants, according to local Pakistani security officials. Although most sources reported that a house and car were hit, Geo TV and others also reported that a missile targeted ‘militants fleeing on a motorbike.’ The Express Tribune identified those killed only as ‘people’, while the Pakistan Observer claimed that all of the dead were ‘ordinary tribesmen’, and also noted that ‘drones kept hovering over the skies for quite some time creating panic and harassment among the residents.’ In January 2014 the Bureau published a secret internal record of CIA drone strikes in Pakistan. The document said one ‘local’ died in the strike and that it targeted a motorcycle at 1320.

Location: Ghar Laley, North Waziristan
ReferencesBBC News, Geo TV, Dawn, Express Tribune, CNN, One India, PakObserver, SATP, Xinhua, Long War JournalBureau (investigation), Bureau (data), Bureau

Waziristan mountains 2007 – Flickr/Maverick bashoo

Ob186 – January 12 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
♦ 2-15 injured
The reputed compound of Zafar Khan, allegedly linked to Hafiz Gul Bahadur, was attacked killing up to six alleged militants. According to a secret Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes: ‘The killed persons were Turkman [sic].’ It is not clear if this is referring to people from Turkmenistan or Uighurs from so-called Turkistan, the western Chinese province of Xinjiang The document, published by the Bureau in January 2014, said two people were injured. However initial reports said up to 15 people injured.

Location: Haider Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesBBC News, AFP, Pajhwok, CNN, Geo TV, Xinhua, SATP, Long War Journal, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob187 – January 18 2011
♦ 3-7 total killed
♦ 3 injured
Up to seven alleged militants were killed and three people were injured, in an attack on a house or compound.

In January 2014 the Bureau published a secret Pakistan government record of CIA drone strikes. The document said six people were killed in this attack that hit at 2105. ‘The killed militants were Panjabis from Badar al Mansoor group.’ Badar Mansoor was reportedly killed in February 2012.

Location: Dashgah, Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, PTI, Army Times, xinhua, Geo TV, SATP, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob188 – January 23 2011
♦ 2-5 total killed
In the first of three linked strikes, a car was destroyed as it parked and a nearby house was badly damaged. At least two alleged militants were killed in the vehicle.

Location: Doga Mada Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, CNN, AFP, The Independent, The Nation, Adnkronos, CBS News, WSWS, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Dawn, SATP, Bureau

Ob189 – January 23 2011
♦ 2-3 total killed
In the second of three linked strikes a motorcycle was destroyed killing up to three people including possibly a ‘foreigner’.

Location: Doga Mada Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, CNN, AFP, Al Jazeera English, The Independent, The Nation, WSWS, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Dawn, Bureau

Ob190 – January 23 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
♦ 3 injured including one child
Drones chased a vehicle, reportedly destroying it and a house. Up to six alleged militants were killed and three people were injured. The strike hit at 0735, according to a secret Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes published by the Bureau in February 2014. The document said: ‘The killed were Mehsuds and amongst the injured one child was also included.’

Location: Razmak, North Waziristan
ReferencesCNN, AFP, The Nation, WSWS, Long War Journal, Dawn, Bureau

Ob191 – February 20 2011
♦ 6-8 total killed
♦ 2 injured
After a delay of some weeks following the arrest of CIA contractor Raymond Davis, drone strikes resumed. Three Turkmenistan nationals and 2 ‘Arabs’ were initially reported to be among up to seven dead in an attack on a house. Al Qaeda finance officer Abu Zaid al-Iraqi aka Ali Khan was later reported to be among the dead:

Mr al Iraqi was believed to be one of several foreigners among the seven dead. He was described as being in his late 30s and going by the local name “Ali Khan.” Mr al Iraqi is believed to have shifted to South Waziristan in 2008 after time spent in Afghanistan.

A secret record of CIA drone strikes, compiled by the local political authority and published by the Bureau in January 2014 listed eight people killed in the strike. It said three missiles  were fired on a ‘residential house’ at 2340, killing ’05 Arabs and 03 Punjabis’. An Arab and Punjabi were also reportedly injured.

Location: Azam Warsak, South Waziristan
ReferencesGeo TV, Al Jazeera English, BBC News, CNN, Express Tribune, SATP, Xinhua, The Guardian, Amerpundit (BNO News), freerepublic.com, Fox News, The Nation, The News, Long War Journal, sify.com (IANS), Long War Journal, Associated Press, Bureau

Ob192 – February 21 2011
♦ 7-14 total killed
♦ 0-11 civilians reported killed
♦ 10 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Local tribesmen (The News)

Up to 14 people were killed in a strike near Mir Ali. Some sources described the dead as militants, including 3-6 ‘foreigners’. However The News reported 11 people were killed and that all of them may have been civilians.

The villagers claimed all the victims were local tribes people and had no affiliation with the militants. They said the injured people were rushed to a nearby hospital in Mir Ali town, where the doctors said condition of some of them was critical.’

An internal record of drone strikes, compiled by the local political administration and published by the Bureau in January 2014, listed 14 killed in this attack. ‘Amongst the killed, 06 were locals while 08 were Mehsud militants.’

Ten people were also injured in the strike on a house and car. Earlier in the day locals had reportedly fired on up to a dozen drones operating in the area.

Location: Malik Jashdar near Mir Ali, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, Express Tribune, Amerpundit (BNO News), BBC News, Dawn, sify.com (IANS), SATP, Associated Press, Long War JournalBureau (investigation), Bureau (data), Bureau

Ob193 – February 24 2011
♦ 4-7 total killed
♦ At least 2 injured
A car and a nearby house were struck. Two ‘Turkmen militants’ were said to be among up to seven people killed. Although the Bureau published an internal record of drone strikes, compiled by the local political authority, in January 2014. It said the strike hit at 1900 and killed four locals.

Location: Mohammad Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe Nation, TopNews, Reuters, BBC News, CNN, Dawn, Monsters and Critics, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob194 – March 8 2011
♦ 5 total killed
♦ 0-5 civilians reported killed
♦ 2-3 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed local sources (Bureau field researchers), local sources and media referring to ‘people’ rather than militants (XinhuaDaily Times)

Fazal Karim’s reputed house was mostly destroyed, killing up to five people – possibly all civilians, or ‘foreigners’ according to one local official – and wounding three. Rescue work was delayed due to three drones remaining over the village. The attack came hours after a local tribal meeting called for an end to the CIA strikes. Elder Malik Ajmal told a senior Pakistan government official: ‘We would like an immediate end to the drone strikes which have made our children and women psychologically ill.’ The Bureau’s own field researchers later reported:

Five were killed and seven injured when the house of a tribesman Fazal Ikram was hit. Many people said he wasn’t a militant and that those killed were civilians. However, some sources insisted that those killed were militants.

Location: Landidog, South Waziristan
References: Xinhua, CBS (Associated Press), The Daily Times, Dawn (AFP), Amerpundit.com (BNO), Long War Journal, SATP, DawnBureau (investigation), Bureau (data), Bureau

Ob195 – March 8 2011
♦ 5 total killed
♦ 2-3 injured
A poorly-reported strike, in which three missiles hit a house and killed five alleged militants, injuring up to three people.

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesXinhua, SATP, Dawn,

Ob196 – March 11 2011
♦ 4-12 total killed
♦ 5 civilians reported killed
♦ ‘Many’ injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed locals (PakObserverDawn), field researchers (Bureau)

A double strike on a vehicle (and possibly a house) killed up to 12 people including rescuers. The Pakistan Observer reported at the time:

In [the] first attack a US drone struck a suspected vehicle with at least two hellfire missiles killing three people on board and wounded many others as the vehicle was also destroyed completely. Sources said adding as the rescue operation was in progress and the people retrieving the dead bodies from the targeted vehicle, the American planes struck again after a pause of 10 minutes leaving another three people dead.

Some locals reported that all of the dead were civilians, for example dawn which noted: ‘When local people rushed towards the burning vehicle to remove bodies and help the injured, the unmanned plane fired two missiles’. As part of its investigation into the CIA’s deliberate targeting of rescuers, the Bureau’s own researchers in Waziristan reported that five Taliban and five civilian rescuers were killed in the attack, who they named as Noor Gul, Jaffar, Faraz, Musa and Kamal. An internal record of CIA drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, reported only four people were killed in this attack – all of them locals.

Location: Khesoor, North Waziristan
ReferencesPakObserver, Express Tribune, Dawn, Long War Journal, BBC News Pakistan, The News, United News Service, Jang (Urdu), Bureau (rescuers investigation), Bureau (rescuers data), Bureau (civilian deaths investigation), Bureau (civilian data), Bureau

Ob197 – March 11 2011
♦ 4 total killed
A ‘white car’ was destroyed killed four alleged militant victims. They were said to be from South Waziristan. The News reported on the gruesome aftermath:

The four men seated in the white car were killed on the spot and their bodies mutilated beyond recognition. The villagers said bodies of the slain men were scattered all over the place. Rescuers collected pieces of flesh and bones that were stuffed in bags and taken for burial.

An internal record of drone strikes compiled by the local political administration was published by the Bureau in 2014. It said no people were killed in this attack however the entry for this strike said ‘no details available yet’.

Location: Ghoroski, North Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Dawn, BBC News Pakistan, The News, United News Service, Bureau

Ob198 – March 13 2011
♦ 0-4 total killed
♦ 0-5 injured
A vehicle was damaged Reporting is confused, with some media claiming that up to four alleged militants were killed and five injured – and others that all were able to flee when a missile initially missed the car. In January 2014 the Bureau published an internal Pakistan government record of US drone strikes. It said there were ‘no casualties confirmed’ in this strike. ‘At about 1015 hours, drone fired four missiles at a double cab pickup boarded by 5-6 non-local militants,’ the document said. ‘Vehicle damaged but the boarded militants made their escape good.’

Location: Azam Warsak, South Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Express Tribune, AFP, Xinhua, All Voices, Dawn, Pajhwok, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob199 – March 13 2011
♦ 4-7 total killed
♦ 5 injured
At least six alleged TTP militants were killed and five were injured in an attack on a house and car. The target was reported to be local TTP leader Rahimullah (his status is unknown). An internal Pakistan government record of CIA drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, said this strike killed four locals, meaning people from the tribal region.

Location: Spalaga, North Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Wall Street Journal, AFP, SATP, Pajhwok, Long War Journal, Xinhua, Dawn, Monsters and Critics, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob200 – March 14 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
A moving truck was attacked and exploded in or near a village, killing up to five people including two ‘Arabs’. The News noted local tribesmen as saying that ‘body parts of the slain men lay scattered all along the road and in nearby fields. Later, when the drones disappeared, the villagers collected the body parts and buried them.’

Location: Malik Jashdar, North Waziristan
ReferencesBBC News, SATP, CNS News, Express Tribune, sduniontribune.com, All Voices, Monsters and Critics, Dawn, The Nation, The News, CNN, Bureau

Ob201 – March 16 2011
♦ 3-5 total killed
An attack on either a housing compound or a car reportedly killed up to five alleged militants. An internal record of drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, listed three killed in this attack: one from the tribal regions and two described as ‘non-local’ – either foreigners or Pakistanis from outside the tribal region.

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Dawn, BBC News, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob202 – March 17 2011
♦ 26-42 total killed
♦ 19-41 civilians reported killed (including 1 child according to one source)
♦ 9-14 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Pakistan’s chief of army staff (official press releaseForeign Policy), Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry (official press release), named commander of local forces (Bureau), provincial governor (Dawn), unnamed locals (BBC NewsThe NewsWall Street JournalXinhuaAP field investigation), named locals (Daily MailReprieve complaint to UN Human Rights CouncilLeigh Day & CoStanford/NYU Living Under DronesAP field investigationBureau), unnamed Pakistani intelligence officials (New York TimesAl JazeeraCNNGeo TVAFPAP field investigation), militant sources (Express Tribune), Foundation for Fundamental Rights (petitions to Peshawar High Court), named witness of the immediate aftermath (Huffington Post), secret Pakistani drone strike data (Bureau)

Coming just two days after the release of CIA contractor Raymond Davis from a Lahore jail after he killed two locals, this disastrous US drone strike brought relations between the two nations to a new low. Missiles from a drone struck a gathering of as many as 42 men in Datta Khel. US officials claimed that the men were all legitimate targets, with one stating ‘These people weren’t gathering for a bake sale. They were terrorists.’ Another insisted: ‘These guys were terrorists, not the local men’s glee club.’ However it soon became clear that the CIA had targeted a tribal jirga, a formal gathering to resolve a local dispute. An internal record of CIA drone strikes in Pakistan, collected by the local authority, listed up to 41 civilians killed in this attack. The document, published by the Bureau in January 2014, said: ‘The attack was carried out on a Jirga and it is feared that all the killed [41] were local tribesmen.’

Uniquely Pakistan’s president, prime minister and army chief all publicly condemned this attack. News later emerged that the US Ambassador to Islamabad had personally tried to halt the strike, only to be over-ruled by the CIA’s chief. A US official reportedly claimed that the attack was ‘in retaliation’ for the imprisonment of Davis. Although up to 11 Taliban were said by some to be among the dead, up to 38 civilians were also reported killed, including tribal elders and local policemen. The Bureau’s own researchers in Waziristan told us: ‘Several members of the government-managed and armed Khassadar force were present at the jirga because the government had got involved in resolving a dispute between two contractors who mined chromite in the nearby hills.

Held in the Nomada bus depot, the meeting was attended by maliks – tribal leaders – along with government officials and local policemen, eyewitnesses told Stanford/NYU researchers. The attendees were seated in ‘two large circles about 12 feet apart’ and were discussing the disagreement when a first missile ‘fired from a US drone hovering above’ struck one of the circles at around 10.45am. Ahmed Jan told the researchers ‘he remembered hearing the hissing sound the missiles made just seconds before they slammed into the centre of his group’. ‘Several’ further missiles rained down on the jirga, with at least one hitting the second group, the Stanford/NYU researchers found. Jalal Manzar Khail told Reprieve he heard two missiles hit the ground and saw two more shortly afterwards. He arrived at the scene soon after the strike – the injured were rushed to hospital and he had to ‘[put] body parts in different boxes… [Using] boxes as coffins’. In June 2013 he told the independent filmmakers four of his cousins were killed in the strike: Muzammal Khan, Sher Hayat Khan, Nek Bahadur Khan and Belal Khan. He also told the filmmakers from Brave New Films four others civilians were killed in this strike: Nendar Khan, Hakim Khan, Mushk Alam and Daraz Khan.

The leader of the jirga, Malik Daud Khan, aged 45 was among those killed. Sharabat Khan also reportedly died, identified variously as a local militant or as the leaseholder of the mine. In July 2011 the Bureau’s field researchers additionally identified the following as slain civilians: Gul Akbar; Mohammad Sheen; Lewanai; Mir Zaman; Din Mohammad; Malik Tareen; Noor Ali; Zare Jan; Sadiq; Mustaqeem; Khangai; Gulnaware; Faenda Khan; and Dindar Khan, Umark Khan, Wali Khan, Sadar and Bakhtar, all five from the Khassadar police force.

In sworn affidavits from multiple witnesses to the strike, filed in the London High Court in March 2012, five further civilians were identified by name: Ismail Khan, father of Imran Khan; khassadar Hajji Babat, father of Khalil Khan; Khnay Khan, father of Mir Daad Khan; and Gul Mohammed and his son Ismael.

‘We were told in plain words that none of the elders that had attended survived. They were all destroyed, all gone,’ Khalil Khan told Stanford/NYU researchers, adding that all he could do to bury his father was ‘collect pieces of flesh and put them in a coffin’. ‘Nearly all those killed were the heads of large households’, the Stanford/NYU researchers note, adding that this sudden loss caused many of their bereaved family members severe financial difficulties. The Pakistani government offered families three lakhs (approximately $3,200) in compensation, witnesses told interviewers, but most said they had refused it. ‘[O]ur elders were worth much more than that… [W]e had lost an entire community of elders,’ they told researchers.

The CIA continues to claim that no civilians died in the attack. A US official commenting on the Bureau’s findings, stated: ‘There’s no question the Pakistani and U.S. governments have different views on the outcome of this strike. The fact is that a large group of heavily armed men, some of whom were clearly connected to Al Qaeda and all of whom acted in a manner consistent with A.Q.-linked militants, were killed.’

Confusion remains about how many people died that day. At the time, Taliban sources told the Express Tribune that 12 of its members had died out of 26 killed in total. In February 2012 Associated Press published a report of the incident based on extensive field research, stating that only four attendees appeared to have been Taliban. It also listed a fresh US counter-claim:

Citing the number visible in the monitoring before and during the attack, US officials said the total of dead was roughly half what villagers reported. But [local farmer Gul] Ahmed said there were 42 caskets lined up at the funeral, and he provided the victims’ names.

In the same month, a joint investigation by the Bureau and the Sunday Times cited Pakistan’s military commander in Waziristan at the time, Brigadier Abdullah Dogar: ‘We in the Pakistan military knew about the meeting, we’d got the request 10 days earlier. It was held in broad daylight, people were sitting out in Nomada bus depot when the missile strikes came. Maybe there were one or two Taliban at that Jirga – they have their people attending – but does that justify a drone strike which kills 42 mostly innocent people?’

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
References: Pakistan Ministry of Defence, Dawn, Pakistan Foreign Ministry, Dawn, BBC News, Daily Mail, New York Times, Al Jazeera English, CNNThe News, Express Tribune, Geo TV, Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy, Wall Street Journal, AFP, Xinhua, AFP, CNN, BBC News, Long War Journal, AP, The Economist, New York Times, Reprieve, The Bureau, Leigh, Day & Co, Nieman Watchdog, The Bureau, Stanford/NYU Living Under Drones, Toronto Star, Huffington Post, Bureau


2011.03.17 Datta Khel jirga Ob203-4 / Noor Behram


April 2011 -June 2011 

Ob203 – April 13 2011
♦ 4-7 total killed
♦ 0-7 civilians reported killed
♦ 6-10 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: 
Named official indicates possible civilian casualties (Pajhwok), unnamed ‘official sources’ describe the dead as ‘people’, rather than ‘militants’ (Xinhua)

Up to seven alleged militants were killed and six or more people were injured following an attack on a double-cabin truck and and a motorbike which were reportedly crossing from Afghanistan. A house was also damaged, according to Pajhwok, with political administration official Khiyal Gul telling the Afghan agency that he was unable to ascertain whether militants or civilians were killed in the raid, and another named villager, Salim, telling the same agency that those killed were militants. An anonymous US official told the New York Times that the target was forces linked to Maulvi Nazir, a Taliban commander fighting Nato forces across the border.

These operations are consistent with the US-Pakistan agreements that have been in place for some time. This was about protecting Americans in the region. This is not about sending a signal to Pakistan.’

A spokesman with Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry later condemned the strike, coming as it did days after the head of Pakistan’s intelligence service had complained to Washington about the drone strikes: ‘Drone attacks have become a core irritant in the counter-terror campaign. Pakistan has taken up the matter with the US at all levels,’ a ministry statement read. CNN also reported a senior Pakistani intelligence official as saying:

It’s unilateral action. What is this? A message [from the Americans] that it’s business as usual, irrespective of what we ask of you? If it is, it’s a crude way of getting your message across.’

Location: Angor Adda, South Waziristan
ReferencesReuters, Associated Press, New York Times, AFP, CNN, Pajhwok, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Pakistan Foreign Ministry, CNNBureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data), Bureau

2011.03.17 Datta Khel Jirga Member Malik Dawood Ob203-4/ Noor Behram

Ob204 – April 22 2011
♦ 20-26 total killed
♦ 5-9 civilians reported killed, including 3-5 children
♦ 2-10 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed Pakistani official (New York TimesBBC NewsReutersCNN), named locals (Associated PressThe NewsWall Street Journal), local TV indicating uncertainty over identity of the dead (Xinhua), field researchers (Bureau), leaked US intelligence document (McClatchy)

A pre-dawn attack by two drones on a house and guesthouse killed up to 26 people. The strike took place as ISI chief Lt General Ahmed Shuja Pasha was in Washington DC, where he had already had a ‘shouting match‘ with CIA head Leon Panetta. He is said to have viewed this attack as ‘a slap‘ from the US government.

There were reports of at least three women and four or five children among the dead, as the BBC, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and many others stated. The News reported further details of those killed, saying that ‘A local tribesman Muhammad Sharif owned the targeted house and Hujra [guest area]. Sharif is the first cousin of Maulvi Gul Ramzan, the head of the North Waziristan peace committee and a noted cleric who has negotiated peace talks between the government and local Taliban several times. Gul Ramzan and other members of the peace committee, including Hafiz Noorullah Shah, Malik Mamoor Khan and Malik Nasrullah Khan, have condemned the drone attack and claimed that all those killed and injured were common tribesmen. Maulvi Gul Ramzan told The News that the majority of the people who died in the attack were his close relatives. He denied reports that some local and foreign militants were staying at the Hujra at the time of the attack.’ Local elder Mehboob Jan also told the Wall Street Journal that ‘ The entire compound was turned into rubble. Some women and children were also believed to have been killed in the strike.’

In an unprecedented move, an unknown ‘US official’ told CNN at the time: ‘There is no evidence to support that claim [of civilian casualties] whatsoever.Leaked US intelligence reports say otherwise. Reports obtained by McClatchy in 2013 showed the US recorded at least one civilian death in the strike. And an extensive field investigation by Associated Press confirmed that alongside some 20 militants, women and children also died:

The strike killed 25 people, including 20 militants, three children and two women, said Mamrez Gul, who owns a shop near the site of the attack. The militants were staying in the guest room, and the civilians were sleeping in a nearby room that was also destroyed by the blasts. A funeral was held for the women and children, but the bodies of the militants were taken away, said Mamrez Gul. He said the women and children were relatives of the compound’s owner, Gul Sharif, a militant commander loyal to Bahadur. He survived the attack, said two villagers, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Taxi driver Noor Habib Wazir and farmer Gul Paenda Khan also told AP they attended the funeral of the women and children. The Bureau’s own researchers in Waziristan reported some local dispute over whether women had been killed. They named one dead child as a 12-year old, Atif.

Location: Spinwan, North Waziristan
ReferencesNew York Times, The News, Reuters, Wall Street Journal, BBC News, Geo TV, Xinhua, CNN, Long War Journal, Associated Press, ABC NewsBureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data), McClatchy, Bureau

Ob205 – May 6 2011
♦ 7-18 total killed
♦ 6 civilians reported killed
♦ 4 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Field researchers (BureauAssociated Press), unnamed Pakistani intelligence officials (Associated Press), the dead are identified 
as ‘people’ rather than ‘militants’ (Dawn)

In the first strike following Osama bin Laden’s death, a US attack took place on a vehicle carrying ‘explosives and nearly ten armed men,’ according to a US official in August 2011, although at the time reports claimed the target was a religious school (and suspected militant hideout). The attack also hit a nearby unrelated roadside eatery and a house.

As part of a Bureau investigation in 2011 into CIA claims that its drones were no longer killing civilians, our researchers in Waziristan reported: The total number of people killed was 18. Six were civilians while the rest were stated to be militants. The civilians were identified as Samad, Jamshed, Daraz, Iqbal, Noor Nawaz and Yousaf.’

A US official subsequently commented on these Bureau’s findings:

The claim that a restaurant was struck is ludicrous. This was a vehicle carrying explosives and nearly 10 armed men, which was engaged in a remote area just a couple miles from the Afghanistan border. There’s no question where they or the explosives were headed — let’s remember that the goal here is protect the lives of Afghans, Pakistanis and Americans who would otherwise be killed by these militants.

The Bureau points out that the US official states that it killed ‘nearly 10 armed men’. Yet our researchers – along with the New York Times, CNN, the Washington Post and others at the time – all report a significantly higher death toll than 10 in this strike. We have provided the CIA with the names of those civilians identified to us as killed and asked for specific comment. As of February 2013 we still await a response.

In February 2012 an independent investigation by Associated Press during which local people were questioned about this and other strikes, again confirmed that six civilians were killed in the attack along with 10 Taliban. However in January 2014 the Bureau publishe an internal Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes that listed seven Punjabi militants killed in this attack.

Location: Dwa Tooe, North Waziristan
ReferencesWashington Post, Dawn, Muslim News, Associated Press, Express Tribune, Geo TV, CNN, The News, Reuters, Xinhua, New York Times, BBC News, SATP, Dawn, Long War Journal, New York Times, AP, Bureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data), Bureau

Ob206 – May 10 2011
♦ 3-5 total killed
♦ 4 injured
An attack on a house and car believed to be aimed at Maulvi Nazir‘s militant group killed up to five people and injured four. Three ‘Arabs’ were reportedly among the dead. However an internal Pakistani document, published by the Bureau, said this strike killed three ‘locals’.

Location: Angor Adda, South Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, adnkronos.com, Express Tribune, The Peninsula Qatar, AFP, BBC, Long War Journal, CNN, Bureau

Ob207 – May 12 2011
♦ 5-8 total killed
♦ 1 injured
Six drones reportedly attacked a pick-up van (and possibly a house) killing up to eight alleged militants, including ‘foreigners’, and injuring one person. The Bureau published an internal Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes in January 2014. It said five people were killed, adding: ‘Reportedly, amongst the killed two were Punjabis.’

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, Dawn, The News, Reuters, AFP, CNN, BBC News, Xinhua, SATP, Al Jazeera English, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob208 – May 13 2011
♦ 3-5 total killed
Up to five alleged militants were killed in an attack on a moving car that was ‘reduced to ashes’.

Location: Doga Mada Khel
ReferencesThe Nation, Al Jazeera English, weaselzippers.us, Express Tribune, CNN, Reuters, Al Jazeera English, Xinhua, Dawn, SATP, Long War Journal

Ob209 – May 16 2011
♦ 4-10 total killed
♦ 2 injured
An attack on a compound killed up to ten alleged militants, possibly all ‘foreigners’ – and injured two people. Reuters later reported one of the dead as ‘the son of an al Qaeda operative identified as Abu Kashif.’ The Conflict Monitoring Centre in Pakistan reported ‘local commander Moulana Bashir‘ was killed in this attack. The attack caused a diplomatic incident. US Senator John Kerry was leaving Pakistan that day, following an effort to defuse tensions following the death of Osama bin Laden. In response to the strike ‘Pakistani army chief Kayani and President Zardari sent Kerry angry messages that he received when he touched down in Dubai’ (AP). Casualties of this strike are sometimes confused with those of Ob210.

Location: Sandasa, North Waziristan
ReferencesAFP, The News, The Nation, Dawn, Xinhua, Reuters, CNN, SATP, Long War Journal, AP, CMC, Bureau

Ob210 – May 16 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
Up to six alleged militants were killed in an attack on a pick-up truck. The casualties of this strike are sometimes confused with those of Ob210. A secret Pakistani document, published by the Bureau in January 2014, said six non-locals were killed in this attack.

Location: Mir Ali, North Waziristan
ReferencesAFP, The News, Dawn, Reuters, SATP, Bureau

Related article: Analysis: the covert drone war

Ob211 – May 20 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
Up to six alleged militants were killed when their moving car was destroyed on the road between Miranshah and Spalga. The strike reportedly killed locals.

Location: Tappi, North Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Los Angeles Times, CNN, Express Tribune, Dawn, SATP, AFP, Xinhua, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob212 – May 23 2011
♦ 4-7 total killed
♦ At least 2 injured
A van was destroyed and as many as seven alleged militants were killed, reportedly all ‘foreigners’. An internal Pakistani record of drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, said all seven dead were Uzbeks.

Location: Mir Ali, North Waziristan
ReferencesDawn, PakObserver, CNN, BBC News, Reuters, Express Tribune, The News, Xinhua, Daily Times, SATP, Bureau

Ob213 – June 3 2011
♦ 5-12 total killed
♦ 3 injured
Ilyas Kashmiri
, Al Qaeda affiliate and senior commander, was reported killed as he slept in an orchard along with up to 11 other militants, some named as Mohammad Usman, Ibrahim, Ustad Ahmad Farooq, Amir Hamza and Imran. Others killed were described as ‘members of the Punjabi Taliban and some belonging to the Ahmadzai Wazir and Afridi tribes.’ An alternative narrative reports that Kashmiri was only injured in the strike, and was later killed in another CIA attack in nearby Wacha Dana on either June 6 or June 15.

Despite Pakistan insisting that Kashmiri had died, suspicions were almost immediately raised. Only days earlier US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had reportedly presented Pakistan with a ‘death list’ of senior militants the US wanted killed. Some saw the timing of his reported death as suspicious. Six weeks later reports began emerging that Kashmiri had survived. But on August 30 Asia Times reported that the 313 Brigade, Kashmiri’s unit, had appointed a new commander. It has been claimed that the US State Department was ‘angry‘ that this strike, along with Ob214 and Ob215, had taken place. (AP)

In early March 2012 a report again claimed that Kashmiri was still alive, and had attended a Pakistan Taliban meeting in the tribal areas. But on March 10 Al Qaeda’s media wing released a video in which it acknowledged the ‘martyrdom’ of Kashmiri. On May 18 2012, the United Nations Security Council listed Kashmiri as deceased. Ustad Farooq had, however survived, releasing a video eulogy to a dead comrade in the same month. In August 2012 it was claimed that Kashmiri had survived the initial June 3 attack, only to be killed the following week in Azam Warsak by a drone as he recuperated.

Location: Ghwa Khwa, South Waziristan
References: Fox News, Dawn, AFP, Dawn, Long War Journal, ndtv.com, Reuters, Express Tribune, Indian Express, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, Express Tribune, Dawn, CNN, AFP, SATP, Asia Despatch. Asia Times, The News, Daily Times, Long War Journal, The Orange Tracker, Indian Express, UN Security Council, The News, The NewsThe News, The Nation, Bureau

Ob214 – June 6 2011
♦ 7-9 total killed
♦ Possible civilian deaths (see Ob216)
♦ 2 injured
The reported home of Zari Khan Shamsikhel was destroyed in the first of three CIA strikes in South Waziristan. Up to nine people – reported by some as ‘Punjabi Taliban’ or as ‘foreigners’ – were killed in the attack. The Bureau published an internal Pakistani document in January 2014 that listed ‘four Panjabis and three foreigners’ killed in the strike

Location: Shalam Raghzai, South Waziristan
ReferencesThe Nation, BBC News, CNN, Reuters, Express Tribune, Geo TV, Al Jazeera English, New York Times, Time, Dawn, Xinhua, Xinhua, Xinhua, SATP, Express Tribune, Bureau

Ob215 – June 6 2011
♦ 8-10 total killed
♦ 0-7 civilians reported killed in this strike or Ob215
♦ 3 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed witnesses (CNN), a named reporter (Al Jazeera), reporting of the dead as ‘people’ rather than ‘militants’ (New York TimesXinhua).

Some 15 minutes after the previous strike, and just two miles distant, up to 10 people were killed in a strike on a religious school or home. Seven civilians were reportedly among the dead in this or Ob214 according to local officials cited by CNN:

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media, said all 21 [killed] were militants. However, witnesses told CNN affiliate Geo TV at the scene that among the dead were seven civilians.

Al Jazeera’s correspondent also reported ‘there were concerns that civilians could be among the dead’. The Nation described the men as ‘local fighters’.

A year later, The News reported that Ilyas Kashmiri, already injured in a drone strike of June 3, was in fact killed in Wacha Dana ‘about a week later’. This strike and one on June 15 most closely match that claim.

Location: Wacha Dana, South Waziristan
ReferencesThe Nation, Express Tribune, BBC News, CNN, Reuters, Express Tribune, Geo TV, Al Jazeera English, New York Times, Time, AFP, Xinhua, Reuters, The NewsBureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data)

Ob216 – June 6 2011
♦ 3-5 total killed
In the third FATA drone strike of the day, a vehicle was destroyed killing up to five alleged militants in the borderlands between North and South Waziristan. Up to five drones were reported to be flying in the area, with the attack taking place at around 10am, some eight hours after the previous two strikes.

Location: Darnashtra, South Waziristan
ReferencesThe Nation, Express Tribune, BBC News, CNN, Reuters, Express Tribune, Geo TV, Al Jazeera English, New York Times, Time, Dawn, Xinhua, Express Tribune, Bureau

Ob217 – June 8 2011
♦ 18-23 total killed
♦ 6-12 injured
An attack on a housing compound in a forested area of the Shawal valley by four or five drones killed between 18 and 23 ‘suspected militants’, including ‘foreigners’, with a further six people injured. Some sources linked the dead to Hafiz Gul Bahadur’s group, with the housing compound described as ‘a major training centre.’ Villagers took part in the rescue work, with The News noting that:

Tribesmen living in the valley said local people arrived on the spot an hour after the attack and retrieved the bodies and injured trapped under the debris of the destroyed building.

Location: Zoynari or Zoi, South Waziristan
References:  Reuters, Reuters, The News, New York Times, Express Tribune, AFP, BBC, Xinhua, SATP, Dawn, Bureau

Abbottabad- Flickr/Environmentalist

Ob218 – June 8 2011
♦ 4 total killed
Four people – possibly militants – were reported killed in an attack on a truck a few kilometres distant from the previous strike. The News reported that ‘Some tribesmen felt it seemed the drones were following the double cabin pickup truck carrying some people, suspected to be militants, from somewhere near the Afghan border.’

Location: Shawal, South Waziristan
ReferencesDawn, New York Times, Reuters, BBC News, Xinhua, The News, Express Tribune

Ob219 – June 15 2011
♦ 2-10 total killed
♦ 2 injured
An attack on a house (reported as owned by tribesman Zar Wali Khan Wazir) killed up to ten people. Two people were injured. At the time the Pakistan Tribune noted that ‘there was no information about the identity of the slain men but local tribesmen said they were tribal militants affiliated with the Pakistani Taliban commander, Maulvi Nazeer. Some reports, however, suggested that a senior militant commander of the Maulvi Nazeer group was also killed in the attack.’

Fourteen months later The News reported that Ilyas Kashmiri may have only been injured in a June 3 strike, and instead may have died ‘a week later’ in a drone strike near Wana. This and a June 6 strike most closely match those details.

Location: Near Wana, South Waziristan
ReferencesDawn, The News, Dawn (archived), PakTribune (archived), CNN, Express Tribune (Reuters), Associated Press, SATP, The News, Bureau

Ob220 – June 15 2011
♦ 0 total killed
♦ 0 civilians reported killed
♦ 0 injured
No injuries were reported as four car occupants (possibly ‘Punjabi militants’) escaped into an orchard before their vehicle was destroyed.

Location: Karez, South Waziristan
ReferencesPakTribune, Associated Press, Express Tribune, AFP, BBC News, Dawn, The News

Ob221 – June 15 2011
♦ 5-6 total killed
♦ 5-6 civilians reported killed
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reportsUnnamed tribesmen (DawnThe News), villagers refer to dead as ‘people’ not ‘militants’ (PakTribune), complaint to UN Human Rights Council (Reprieve), interviews with named and anonymised locals (Stanford/NYU), field researchers (Bureau).

A car was destroyed and up to six people were reported killed on the Mir Ali-Miranshah road. The Bureau’s researchers in Waziristan reported:

Civilians belonging to the Zangbar family of the Toorikhel Wazir tribe were killed. Those killed included Shahzada [or Sherzada], who was a student and was the grandson of a tribal elder Malik Shahzada, the 50-year-old head of the Toorikhel Wazir tribe. Malik Shahzada has shifted to Peshawar with his family due to fear of the local Taliban. How could he or his slain grandson be Taliban when the family had to leave their ancestral village and shift to Peshawar to avoid harm at the hand of the Taliban?

Also killed were Akram Shah, a government employee driving the car; Atiq ur Rehman, nicknamed Tariq, a local pharmacist; Irshad Khan, who worked for Mr Rehman; and Amar Khan, a student at Miranshah college.

For the Living Under Drones study, researchers at Stanford/NYU interviewed several who knew the dead men to build up a more detailed picture of them and the incident. Akram Shah was a ‘father of three in his mid-thirties’, who worked for the Pakistani Water and Power Development Authority as a driver. Shahzada, his cousin, is described as ‘a student in his late teens or early twenties’; both men lived in a family compound in Spulga, a village 15km outside Miram Shah. Atiq ur Rehman is described as a young pharmacist who ran the Razmak Medical shop in Miranshah bazaar, and the father of four children aged under four. Irshad Khan was a teenage student who worked in the pharmacy, while Amar Khan – or Umar Khan – is described as owning a car parts shop.

The five men left Miranshah in Akram’s car that evening, heading towards Spulga, according to accounts given to Stanford/NYU researchers. On the way, it was hit by a missile – although some reports suggest up to six missiles were fired at the ‘speedy car’. Interviewee Abdul Qayyum Khan told researchers Amar Khan had escaped the vehicle and been hit by a separate missile. A witness described how he heard the attack from 2km away; another described the car as resembling ‘a sandwich bent in half’. Locals told PakTribune up to five drones were seen overhead, and remained in the area for over an hour, preventing rescue attempts.

The civilian deaths led to an outpouring of local anger, with residents using the coffins of the dead to block roads in protest. Some reports indicated that one further unidentified person may have been killed in the strike (Dawn).

Location: Mir Ali, Miram Shah, North Waziristan
ReferencesPakTribune, Dawn, The News, CNN, Boston.com, AFP, BBC News, Dawn, SATP, Reprieve, Stanford/NYU Living Under DronesBureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data), Bureau

Ob222 – June 20 2011
♦ 5-7 total killed
♦ 2-7 civilians reported killed
♦ 0-3 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reportsNamed local official refers to the dead as ‘people’ and ‘tribesmen’ rather than ‘militants’ (Associated Press), unnamed locals (Express Tribune), field researchers (Bureau)

Up to seven people were reported killed in a double-tap attack on rescuers in the first of a two strikes in Kurram Agency, a rare target. Five initially died when a car was destroyed. As tribesmen attempted aid, drones killed a further two people, local official Noor Alam told Associated Press. ‘As tribesmen rushed to the scene, the vehicle was struck again, killing two more people, he said.’ However the Bureau’s own researchers in Waziristan, while reporting that all of those died were civilians, said that no rescuers were killed. The Express Tribune also reported:

Those killed were said to be affiliated with the Haqqani network, however, local sources said the deceased were local tribesmen.

According to Dawn and others the targets were in a stronghold of Fazal Saeed Utezai, a powerful local militant commander.

Location: Khardand, Kurram Agency
References: DawnVoice of America, Associated PressThe Nation (Pakistan), The Hindu, Express Tribune, Al Jazeera EnglishXinhuaDaily TimesAFPCNNBBC NewsReutersLong War JournalBureau (civilian investigation), Bureau (civilian data), Bureau (rescuers investigation), Bureau (rescuers data), Bureau

Ob223 – June 20 2011
♦ 2-5 total killed
In the second strike of the day in Kurram, a house was struck and up to five alleged militants, said to be mainly Afghanis, were killed. The local political administration gathered data on the drone strikes in a secret document that the Bureau published in January 2014. It said two people were killed in this strike – both non-locals.

Location: Zarakai, Kurram Agency
ReferencesBoston Globe (Associated Press)The Nation (Pakistan)DawnThe HinduExpress TribuneAl Jazeera EnglishXinhuaDaily TimesAFPCNNBBC NewsReutersLong War Journal, Bureau

Ob223c – June 20 2011
♦ 5 total killed
A possible third attack may have taken place in Kurram on a ‘suspect compound’ killing five alleged militants. However reporting remains confused and this strike is not presently included in our data.

Location: Qama Mela, Kurram Agency
ReferencesVoice of America, Boston.com, The Nation (Pakistan), Voice of America, Daily Times, Long War Journal, AFP, CNN, BBC News, Reuters, Yahoo, Al Jazeera English, XinhuaThe Hindu

Ob224 – June 27 2011
♦ 6-12 total killed
Up to a dozen people were reported killed in an attack on one or two trucks. Three ‘foreigners’ and five local Taliban fighters were reported among the dead. Sources reported that Shakirullah Shakir, a spokesman for the TTP‘s Fidayeen e Islami or suicide bomb squad, was among those killed. However he had been reported killed three weeks before, shot by unknown attackers. The shooting reportedly coincided with discord within the TTP. Hakimullah Mehsud had been in charge of the group for a year but schisms were said to be emerging. Shakir was a ‘key figure’ in the TTP and a tribal source told Express Tribune his shooting was ‘like a slap on the face for [Mehsud]. Nobody could have imagined such things here sometime back.’

Location: Shawal, North Waziristan
ReferencesAl Jazeera English, PakObserver, The News, Express Tribune, BBC News, Xinhua, XinhuaDawn, Asia Pulse, Express Tribune

Ob225 – June 27 2011
♦ 12-21 total killed
♦ 0-20 civilians killed
♦ At least 2 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Named local (Pajhwok), anonymous Pakistani intelligence official does not specify identity of those killed (Al Jazeera), reporting refers to ‘people’ rather than ‘militants’ (BBC NewsExpress TribuneXinhua)

An alleged militant training camp or house was ‘completely destroyed’ and up to 21 people were killed, with at least two people injured. Although the site was linked by one source to militant commander Adam Khan, and most referred to alleged militants killed, local man Hajji Malak Dildar later told Pajhwok that 20 civilians had been killed. In contrast The News reported that those killed were linked to the Pakistan Taliban:

Tribal sources said the drone fired four missiles, pounding a house where a group of militants reportedly affiliated with the Hakimullah Mahsud-led TTP were residing. They said 14 militants died on the spot and seven others suffered injuries. There was no immediate information about the identity of the victims.

Location: Shakai, South Waziristan
ReferencesDawn, AFP, PakObserver, The News, The NewsDawn, Al Jazeera English, Express Tribune, BBC News, Xinhua, Xinhua, PajhwokBureau (investigation), Bureau (data), Bureau


July 2011 – September 2011

Ob226 – July 5 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
♦ 0-3 civilians killed, 2 children and 1 woman
♦ 5 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: an internal Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes (Bureau)

An attack on a guesthouse killed up to six alleged militants and injured five. Suspected Australian militant and convert Saif Ullah was later named among the dead, along with Zahirullah. The Bureau’s researchers in Waziristan reported: ‘The missile fired by the drone hit a hujra, or male guesthouse. Saifullah, the Australian national, happened to be a guest of Zahirullah, who owned a general store in Mir Ali bazaar, and both were killed.’ Our researchers report that there is debate over Zahirullah’s militant links:

There was no doubt about Saifullah’s background. He was a white Australian convert, who had grown a beard and used to rotate between North Waziristan and Khost. Sources said he used to fight against the US-led forces in Khost province in Afghanistan and then return to North Waziristan for rest. Saifullah, in his late 30s, had come to North Waziristan four years ago and had lived in Miramshah and other places. In North Waziristan, he was aligned with the Pakistani Taliban militant group headed by Hafiz Gul Bahadur, who signed a peace agreement with the Pakistan government twice in recent years. He had reportedly come from Khost two days before he was killed.

The Australian government continues to deny that one of its citizens was killed.

Location: Mir Ali, North Waziristan
ReferencesAFP, PTI, Xinhua, PakObserver, Long War Journal, Xinhua, CNN, Times of India, The Bureau, The Bureau, Reuters, KUNA, Bureau

Ob227 – July 11 2011
♦ 5-12 total killed
♦ Possible civilian deaths
♦ At least 2 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Anonymous government officials and unnamed reporter indicate uncertainty over identity of the dead (The News).

An evening attack on a van (and also possibly a house) killed up to a dozen people. According to one source five people were reportedly in the van, their identities unknown. Other media reported that the house had been the target.

Several media organisations reported that 10 people were killed in the drone attack while reports from the area said only the five people seated in the vehicle were killed in the strike. Government officials confirmed the incident but expressed ignorance about the identity of the slain persons.

AFP reported that all of those killed were ‘local militants.’

Location: Gurwak, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, The News, AFP, Dawn, Associated Press (via Washington Post), AFP (via Dawn), GeoTV, MSNBC (AP), Geo News, Reuters, BBC News, Bureau

Ob228 – July 12 2011
♦ 12-25 total killed
A second strike in Gurwak (sometimes confused with Ob228) killed between 12 and 25 alleged militants in a housing compound that was said to have been ‘owned by Rahim Noor, having links with militant groups.’

Location: Gurwak, North Waziristan
References: The News, The News, AFP, Dawn, Washington Times, Dawn, GeoTV, MSNBC (AP), Geo News, Reuters, BBC News, Asian Tribune

Ob229 – July 12 2011
♦ 5-13 total killed
♦ 3-5 injured
An attack on a house and/ or car killed up to thirteen alleged militants, including ‘foreigners’, and injured five. Five students ‘with militant links’ were killed in either this or Ob230, three named as Hafiz Bilal, Waheed Ullah and Fayaz. As Pakistan Today reported:

All five youngsters belonged to Southern Lakki Marwat district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. One of them, identified as Hafiz Bilal was a BSc Geology Student in Khan Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan. Sources said Bilal went to the Waziristan region in the summer vacations where he was present in a militant compound when a US drone struck the building, killing him.

The News described a complex mix of people killed, including ‘Punjabi Taliban and tribal fighter… foreign fighters and some Arab nationals.’

Location: Barmal, South Waziristan
ReferencesDigital Journal, Pakistan Today, The News, Pakwatan, STLToday, Geo News Update, BBC News, The News, AFP, Dawn, Pakwatan, Lahore Times, Geo News, Reuters, BBC

Ob230 – July 12 2011
♦ 13-15 total killed
♦ 0-4 civilians reported killed
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: 
Unnamed tribesmen (The News), local TV reports the dead as ‘people’ rather than ‘militants’ (Pakistan Times), field researchers name four civilians (Bureau)

Linked attacks on a house and car killed up to fifteen alleged militants. Reuters reported a Pakistani intelligence official as saying: ‘The missiles were fired as militants sitting in a vehicle were entering into a house used by them as a hideout. The house is on fire.’ Five students described as having ‘militant links’ were killed in either this or Ob229 (above).

The Asian Tribune reported at the time: ’the first attack was followed by another when people started fleeing the compound.’ As part of its investigation into the CIA’s deliberate targeting of rescuers, the Bureau’s own researchers report that drones returned to attack rescuers on this occasion, killing four unnamed Taliban and four civilians they identified as Shabbir, Kalam, Waqas and Bashir.

Location: Dre Nishtar, Shawal valley, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, Pakistan Times, Press TV, The Nation (Pakistan), Asian Tribune, ReutersBureau (rescuers investigation), Bureau (rescuers data)

Ob231 – July 12 2011
♦ 8-9 total killed
♦ 1 civilian reported killed
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Anonymous local officials and tribal sources (The News)

An attack on a car killed up to eight alleged militants. The News reported tribal sources at the time as saying that ‘a local villager driving his personal car came under drone attack’.  The Bureau’s own researchers in Waziristan investigated, and reported:

This drone strike was also directed at the New Adda (new public stand) in Dattakhel town. The New Adda has been attacked at least thrice. Eight suspected militants, all Pakistanis from local tribes, were killed in the attack. A civilian named Abdul Jalil, hailing from the Khaddar Khel clan was also killed. He had come home from Dubai, UAE where he was a migrant worker, on leave.

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
ReferencesThe News, Pakistan Times, Press TV, The Nation, Asian Tribune, Reuters, Bureau

Ob232 – July 20 2011
♦ 4 total killed
♦ At least 2 injured
An attack on a house killed four people – described by one source as ‘suspected militants’. Several others were wounded, and were reported at the time as being in a ‘critical condition.’

Location: Mir Ali, North Waziristan
ReferencesExpress Tribune, Press TV, MSN

Ob233 – August 1 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
♦ 0-6 civilians reported killed
♦ 7 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Named local (Pajhwok), anonymous sources refer to dead as ‘people’ (The News)

A strike on a moving car killed up to six people, allegedly militants, and injured seven. One report described the victims as Punjabi militants allied with Maulvi Nazir. A number of houses also appear to have been damaged in the attack, with one resident claiming that all of those killed were civilians.

Five local Taliban were killed in the missile strike in the Barmal area, near the Afghanistan border, a Wana-based political administration official, Shoaib Wazir, told Pajhwok Afghan News. Two missiles were fired at the vehicle that was completely destroyed and five of its occupants killed, the official said. Haji Abdul Wahab Dawar, an elder from Barmal, said two houses were damaged by the missile assault that happened around noon. He feared the death toll could go up. Another resident, Riaz Gul, alleged the dead were civilians, with no links to the Taliban. The drones continued to fly over the area for quite some time after the strike, he said.

Location: Azam Warsak, South Waziristan
References
AFP, AFP/Express Tribune, Reuters/Dawn, The News, Dawn, CNN, Pajhwok, Bureau

Ob234 – August 2 2011
♦ 3-4 total killed
Up to four alleged militants and/ or local tribesmen were killed in a strike on a moving car . The News reported: ‘Tribal sources said the CIA-operated spy planes disappeared for some time in the past few weeks due to unknown reasons, but suddenly reappeared on Tuesday and launched the attack.’  There was some speculation that this might be linked to the recent resignation of the CIA’s station chief in Islamabad.

Location: Qutab Khel, North Waziristan
References
: Voice of America, The News, AP,  AFP, Bureau

Ob235 – August 10 2011
♦ 8-25 total killed
♦ 3-8 injured
A pre-dawn strike on an alleged housing compound of the Haqqani Network killed up to 23 people. A vehicle was also destroyed in the attack. AFP reported: ‘The vehicle was hit minutes after it reached the house. It looks like the drone was chasing it. One missile hit the vehicle and another hit the house. Four militants sitting in the vehicle were also killed.’ Al Jazeera reported that ‘Uzbeks and Arabs’ may be among the dead. Six months later Associated Press carried out detailed field research on this strike. According to their report:

Villagers said no civilians died. A drone fired missiles at a large brick compound, killing at least 20 Afghan and Pakistani Taliban fighters, said Sajjad Ali, a local driver. The compound hit was known as a rest house for militants run by the Haqqani network, an Afghan group focused on fighting foreign troops in Afghanistan, he said. The charred bodies were hastily buried in a graveyard more than a mile (2 kilometers) away, said Ali, who spoke to several people who attended the burial. Those who attended were not allowed to see the victims’ faces, he said. A second man who spoke to people who attended the burial confirmed Ali’s account. He requested anonymity.

Location: Village near Miramshah, North Waziristan
References
: Dawn, AFP, The Guardian, Al Jazeera, Deccan Herald, Associated Press, Bureau

Ob236 – August 16 2011
♦ 2-7 total killed
♦ 3-4 civilians reported killed, including one child
♦ 2 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Anonymous intelligence official (Deutsche Presse-Agentur), unnamed sources (The Nation)

At least four people were initially reported killed and two people wounded, according to a senior Pakistan security official quoted by agencies.  A vehicle was hit, which may have been the intended target. Also severely damaged was a nearby house. Both were in the vicinity of a girls’ school near the bazaar. There was speculation that the target was members of the Haqqani Network, with AP reporting two possible ‘foreigners’ killed. This was later disputed, with reports that all of those killed were locals. The News reported that all of those killed were ‘local tribal militants’:

Two rooms and the boundary walls of the targeted house as well as nearby houses remained intact as the missile struck the courtyard. The occupants of the house were reportedly sitting in the courtyard preparing to have Sehri, the nighttime meal before fasting, when the attack took place.’

The Nation and Deutsche Presse-Agentur subsequently reported a local intelligence official as saying that two or three women and a child were among the dead. However in January 2014 the Bureau published an internal Pakistani record of CIA drone strikes. It listed only two people killed in this attack.

Location: Miramshah, North Waziristan
References
: Dawn, Wall Street Journal, AFP, AP, BBC, Voice of America, Al Jazeera, The News, The Nation, Daily Times, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, Bureau

Ob237 – August 19 2011
♦ 3-4 total killed
♦  2 injured
Up to four people were killed in a strike on a house in the Shin Warsak area of South Waziristan. There were initial reports that the house belonged to a local tribal elder, reportedly Ahmad Noor, or Muhamad Nauroz, and that those killed were ‘local militants’ or ‘local tribesmen’ with possibly two ‘foreigners’ among them. An internal Pakistan government record of drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, listed three ‘non-locals’ killed in the attack. IRNA reported that the men were part of Maulvi Nazir’s militant group. Villagers were reported to be carrying out rescue work. The attack raised to over 2,300 the minimum people reported killed in the CIA programme, according to the Bureau’s data.

Location: Shin Warsak, South Waziristan
References
: Press TV, Dawn, Hindustan Times, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, The Nation, AFP, CNN, The Nation, The News, IRNA, Bureau

Ob238 – August 22 2011
♦ 3-7 total killed
♦ 0-4 civilians reported killed
♦ 3 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed security official says guest house hit (AFP/Dawn), anonymous official sources report civilian casualties (Dawn)

A vehicle was targeted in the Norak area of North Waziristan, killing alleged militants. AFP cited a local security official as saying that the house of a local tribal elder was also hit. Dawn later reported that the house belonged to tribesman Gul Sawab, and that ‘three militants and four tribesmen from the same family’ died in the attack. On August 27 a US official reported that Al Qaeda’s new second in command, Atiyah abd al-Rahman, died in a Pakistan drone strike ‘earlier that week’. Al-Rahman had reportedly been in constant communication with Osama bin Laden before his death in May 2011. A US official told the New York Times:

Atiyah was at the top of Al Qaeda’s trusted core. His combination of background, experience and abilities are unique in Al Qaeda — without question, they will not be easily replaced.

Media speculation mostly centred on the Norak strike. But The News reported that two separate strikes took place that day, and that al-Rahman and his family died elsewhere. Reuters reported that Pakistani officials could neither confirm al-Rahman’s death, nor his status as al-Qaeda number two. Al Rahman had already been reported dead, in On the first anniversary of his death Al Qaeda reportedly released a biography of the slain leader.

Location: Norak, North Waziristan
References
: Express Tribune, Dawn, The Nation, AFP, CNN, Reuters, Dawn, Daily Times, Yahoo News, New York Times, Daily Mail, The News, Reuters, Deutsche Welle, Wall Street Journal, Associated Press, Washington Post, The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, Daily Beast, Wired, Long War JournalThe News, Bureau

9/11 ten year anniversary memorial at McEntire – Flickr/DVIDSHUB


Ob238c – August 22 2011
♦ 0-6 total killed
♦ 0-3 civilians reported killed, including 2 children
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Unnamed tribal sources (The News)

The News was the single source for reports of a second strike on a house on August 22 that killed a family of Arabs, ‘three men, two children and a lady. Local villagers said an Arab family was residing in the house and all those died in the missile attack were Arab nationals.’ The newspaper speculated that this strike killed Atiyah abd al-Rahman (see Ob239).

Location: Khaisoori, North Waziristan
References
: The News

Ob238ci – September 4 2011
♦ 7 total killed
Urdu TV station Ajj reports that an evening strike killed up to seven alleged militants in an unspecified location in North Waziristan, a day after the end of the four-day Eid holiday. No further details are known from this single source.

Location: North Waziristan
References
Xinhua

Ob239 – September 11 2011
♦ 1-5 total killed
♦ 2 injured

Abu Hafs al Shahri (Saudi Ministry of Interior)
Abu Hafs al Shahri (Saudi Ministry of Interior)

A strike on the tenth anniversary of 9-11 killed up to five alleged militants in Hisokhel, North Waziristan. A localPakistani official told news agency AFP that a vehicle was destroyed, and that a house was also severely damaged in the attack. GeoTV reported that four drones were involved in the strike, and that their presence afterwards ‘impeded rescue work’. The BBC named one of the dead as a local Haqqani Network commanderHafeezullah who died along with a ‘foreigner’. Four days later a US official reported the death of 33-year old Saudi Abu Hafs al-Shahri, said to be al Qaeda’s operational chief in Pakistan. The Washington Post cited a Pakistan intelligence official based in North Waziristan who ‘suspected, but could not confirm, that Shahri was killed in a drone strike on Sept. 11.’ The New York Times assertively reported that the strike killed al-Shahri. The Long War Journal questioned whether al-Shahri held the role of operations chief.

CNN claimed some weeks later that a German, Mohammad al-Faateh, also died in the strike. ‘Faateh, a suspected al Qaeda commander who had come to Afghanistan in 2006 and made his way to Pakistan in December 2009 … had spent time in Saudi Arabia, was a commander with the militant organization Harkat-ul-Jihad- al- Islami (HuJI),’ according to CNN’s Pakistani intelligence sources. Die Welt claimed he was a 27-year old Berliner, also known as Fatih T.

An internal Pakistani government document listed only one ‘non-local’ killed in this attack, despite media consistently reporting four or five people killed. The document was an secret record of CIA drone strikes in Pakistan and was published by the Bureau in January 2014.

Location: Hisokhel, North Waziristan
References
: BBCAFP, The News, Express TribuneNine News, UPI, Antiwar.com, Voice of America, CNN, GeoTV, Washington Post, Radio Free Europe, New York Times, Reuters, Voice of America, BBC, AFP, CNN, Long War Journal, The Guardian, AP, CNN, Die WeltThe News, Bureau

Ob240 – September 23 2011
♦ 3-8 total killed
♦ 3-4 injured
A 12-day hiatus ended with a strike on a house and vehicle east of Miranshah, killing up to eight alleged militants including four ‘foreigners’ of ‘Central Asian origin’, according to a local security figure. The house reportedly belonged to local tribal leader Jamal Wazir. As many as four alleged militants were also wounded. The attack came hours after the US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Mike Mullen, again accused Pakistan’s ISI of colluding with the Haqqani Network, based in the area and a likely target of the attack. One news agency quoted a local intelligence official:

The locals have pulled out the charred bodies of all four people in the vehicle, while the debris of the demolished house is being combed to find dead or injured, if there are any.

Location: Khushali Khel, North Waziristan
References
: AFP, CNN, The News, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, BNO News, Express Tribune, Xinhua, Dawn, Bureau

Ob241 – September 27 2011
♦ 0-4 total killed
♦ 0-2 injured
Up to four people were initially reported killed in a strike on a compound near Wana, South Waziristan. But news agency AFP later quoted a local security official as saying that those in the compound escaped injury: ‘A US drone fired two missiles targeting a vehicle parked in a compound but the militants fled before they could be hit.’ Militant sub-commander Haleem Ullah, reportedly killed three days later, was said to have been among those who escaped. See Ob242.

Location
: Azam Warsak, South Waziristan
References: Express Tribune, Xinhua, Pakistan Today, AP, CNN, AFP, Dawn, Bureau

Ob242 – September 30 2011
♦ 3-4 total killed
♦ 1-5 injured 
Drones again struck South Waziristan – on the same day that Anwar al-Awlaki was killed in Yemen – resulting in the reported deaths of at least three alleged militants, according to a senior security official. The men, traveling in a vehicle, were reportedly part of Maulvi Nazir’s network, a group the US sees as hostile but which has signed local peace agreements with Pakistan. According to Dawn:

One Pakistani official said a deputy to Nazir, named Haleem Ullah, [aka Halimullah, Aleemullah] was among the dead. The official said he was among those militants who had escaped survived a drone strike in South Waziristan three days ago by escaping.

The Hindustan Times reported that Haleem Ullah ‘belonged to the Tujikhel sub-tribe of the Ahmadzai Wazirs and led a group of 300 armed fighters‘ and that he was in the area to resolve a local tribal dispute. Two other dead militants were named by Dawn as Haji Karam and Kharh. SANA reported that five people were also injured in the attack.

Location: Baghar, South Waziristan
References: Pakistan Today, AFP, AP, Voice of America, Dawn, The Nation, CNN, Long War Journal, Express Tribune, SANA, Dawn, Pakistan Observer, The Nation, Hindustan Times, The News, The NewsThe News, Bureau


October 2011  - December 2011 

Ob243 – October 13 2011
♦ 1-6 total killed
♦ 4 injured
After a two week pause CIA strikes resumed in Pakistan, with an attack on Danda Darpakhel, North Waziristan. The village – site of frequent previous strikes – has strong links with the Haqqani Network, a group involved in attacks on US, NATO and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.  Up to six militants were reported killed, including Jalil Haqqani, or Janbaz Zadran. Described as being in charge of communications for the Network. CNN cited Pakistani intelligence officials as saying

Jalil Haqqani, 32, is an Afghan national and operated between Pakistan and Afghanistan.’

Unusually Haqqani was reported killed as he walked down a street. The Washington Post later raised doubts about his status, with suggestions that the man was not directly related to leaders of the Haqqani Network, and was only a street guard. The attack followed recent comments on September 22 by US Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, that the Haqqani Network was a ‘veritable arm’ of Pakistan’s ISI intelligence servicefurther straining relations between the two nominal allies. Marc Grossman, the US special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, arrived in Islamabad for talks on improving those relations on the day of the attack. Maulana Iftiqar was later identified as killed in the strike, described as the head of a religious school in Miranshah. More than 2,000 people attended his funeral.

In January 2014 the Bureau published an internal record of drone strikes kept by the local political authority form information provided by a network of sources in the tribal region. It said ‘one Afghani was killed as reported’ in this attack.

The Washington Post stated that the attack – and subsequent strikes aimed at the Haqqani Network –  were ordered at a September 29 meeting attended by President Obama:

The decision to strike Miran Shah was made at a National Security Council meeting chaired by President Obama … and was intended to ‘send a signal’ that the United States would no longer tolerate a safe haven for the most lethal enemy of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, or Pakistan’s backing for it, said one of several U.S. officials who spoke about internal deliberations on the condition of anonymity. The senior Haqqani figure, Janbaz Zadran, was selected along with other targets to ‘demonstrate how seriously we take the Miran Shah’ threat.

A later secret cable sent by US ambassador to Pakistan Ryan Crocker and leaked to the Washington Post appeared to indicate that there was no clear follow-up.

Location: Danda Darpakhel, North Waziristan
References: AFP, CNN, Dawn, AP, Kuna, Times (South Africa), Washington Post, Al Jazeera, BBC, Reuters, New York Times, Pakistan Today, The News, Washington Post, Foreign Policy, Washington Post, Washington PostThe News, Bureau

Ob244 – October 13 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
♦ 3 injured
In the second reported strike of the day, drones attacked ‘a group of fighters’ in a compound in South Waziristan, killing up to six people. A Pakistani intelligence official told CNN that ‘The compound on the border was used by militants to routinely fire missiles at NATO and Afghan National Army forces.’ Another official told AFP the dead were linked to militant commander Maulvi Nazir, with The News stating that:

Some sources said that all the dead were militants; four had links with the Mullah Nazeer-led group while two were from Afghanistan. After the incident, the local tribal elders held a meeting to condemn the attack.

The local political authority in Pakistan’s tribal region kept a secret record of CIA drone strikes and casualties. The Bureau published this document in January 2014. It listed six killed in this attack, saying ‘two Arabs and two Afghan Nationals were killed’ along with two locals.

Location: Zeba Pahar, South Waziristan
References: Al Jazeera, CNN, Reuters, AFP, New York Times, Pakistan Today, The News, Bureau

Ob245 – October 14 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
The CIA’s drones again returned to the Danda Darpakhel area, with a strike on a vehicle initially reported to have killed three Egyptian alleged militants and possibly one other. Local villagers told The News that ‘three men standing and talking to each other near the car were the targets of the missile attack. All three were killed.‘ The Egyptian Islamic Group later reported the death of Ahmed Omar Abdul Rahman, son of the blind sheikh Omar Abdul Rahman who was convicted of conspiracy in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.  While some sources claimed Rahman died in Afghanistan, Reuters cited a senior Taliban commander as confirming his death in this strike. Associated Press also reported the death of ‘a 28-year-old man named Abdullah who played a key role in handling the financial affairs of the Haqqani Network… He was known locally as Nadeem.’

In April 2012 Abu Miqdad al Masri, a member of the Quetta Shura, was revealed to have died in the strike, along with his two sons Al Miqdad Rafie Mustafa and Khalid Rafie Mustafa (of indeterminate age). Their deaths were announced by al-Masri’s widow in an al Qaeda martyr statement.

In January 2014 the Bureau published an internal Pakistani document listing most of the CIA drone strikes. It was compiled by the local administration using reports from informants spread through the tribal agency. It said three ‘non-locals’ were reported killed in this attack.

Location: Shehzadkot, Danda Darpakhel, North Waziristan
References: Express Tribune, Associated Press, Dawn, Radio Free Europe. Huffington Post, Fox News, AFP, The News, The Nation, NBC, Reuters, AP, Washington Post , Long War Journal, Long War Journal, Bureau

Ob246 – October 15 2011
♦ 3-6 total killed
♦ 3-7 injured
According to the Bureau’s data this attack was the 300th CIA drone strike in Pakistan since 2004. The fourth to hit Waziristan in 48 hours, the strike killed up to six alleged militants allied to commander Maulvi Nazir.  Pakistani intelligence officials told Dawn that a compound was attacked near the village of Angor Adda. An internal Pakistani record of drone strikes, published by the Bureau in January 2014, listed four non-locals killed in this attack – ‘reportedly, all militants were Arabs nationality’.

Location: Angor Adda, South Waziristan
References: Dawn, AP, AFPPress TV, The News, CNN, Reuters, Bureau

Ob246c – October 15 2011
♦ 3-7 total killed
♦ 3-6 injured
There were reports of a further strike in South Waziristan on Maulvi Nazir’s forces, which killed up to seven alleged militants. Some sources claimed the attack was not by drones but by ‘NATO helicopters.’ Three of those killed were named as Hazrat Ali, Sher Ali and Amir Hamza – possibly ‘low level Taliban commanders.’

Location: Baghar Chinah, South Waziristan
ReferencesSANA, Dawn, Conflict Monitoring Centre annual report 2011 (pdf), The Nation, Al Jazeera English,

Ob247 – October 26 2011
♦ 13-22 total killed
♦ 6 injured
An attack on the Pakistan Taliban (TTP) which only emerged two days later reportedly killed between 13 and 22 members of the militant organisation. Pakistani security officials told Reuters that ‘there was strong evidence that Taj Gul Mehsud, a senior Taliban commander and close aide to TTP leader Hakimullah Mehsud, was among the victims in the attack.’  A further five of those killed were reportedly locals from Miranshah, where they were buried. Reporting of the strike was reportedly delayed due to the remoteness of the attack’s location.

On December 23 2011 a TTP suicide bomber attacked a Pakistan Frontier Corps post, killing six, in what it said was a revenge attack for the death of Mehsud.

Location: Bobar, North/ South Waziristan borders
References: Reuters, Long War Journal, Associated Press, Long War Journal, The NewsThe News

Ob248 – October 27 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
♦ 3-4 injured
Hazrat Omar, a 27-year old brother of militant commander Maulvi Nazir, was one of up to five Taliban-linked individuals reported killed in a strike on a vehicle in South Waziristan.  Also reported dead were Nazir’s deputy commander Khan Mohammad Wazir aka Sathaj, Miraj Khan Wazir (a cousin of Nazir, according to the New York Times) and Ashfaq Wazir (both named as commanders by some media), and up to two others. The News reported that

Sources close to Maulvi Nazeer said the commanders had gone to Angoor Adda near the Afghan border earlier in the morning along with three-dozen militants to fight against the Nato forces in Paktika province. The militants had forgotten something important in Wana, the headquarters of South Waziristan, and decided to go back to Wana and bring the material in the vehicle. The militants were passing through the mountainous Tor Korai area near Azam Warsak when their pickup truck came under attack of the CIA-operated spy planes.

Although Nazir’s group has signed a formal peace agreement with Pakistani forces, the US considered it a foe because of ongoing militant operations inside Afghanistan. Recent strikes appeared to have been targeting Nazir’s command structures. The News reported that Nazir himself attended the funeral prayers for the commanders, allegedly saying: To me, all of them were like brothers. Their loss is as heartbreaking as the death of my brother Hazrat Omar.’

Location: Azam Warsak, South Waziristan
References: Dawn, Express Tribune, Fox News, AP, AFP, The News, The Nation, CNN, Washington Post, New York Times, Reuters, The News, DawnThe News, Bureau

Ob249 – October 27 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
♦ 3 injured
A second strike of the day on either a moving vehicle or a house in North Waziristan killed up to six alleged militants, according to Pakistani security officials. The News reported that ‘Tribal sources and security officials based in Mir Ali said the drone fired four missiles at a house. They said four people were killed and three injured in the attack. A car and motorcycle parked inside the house were also damaged in the attack. The injured were shifted to a local hospital in Mir Ali. There was no way to ascertain the identity of the slain men.’ In January 2014 the Bureau published an internal Pakistani assessment of the strikes. It reported four ‘locals’ were killed in both Ob248 and Ob249.

Location: Hishokhel, North Waziristan
References: Express Tribune, AP, The News, Dawn, The News, Bureau

Ob250 – October 30 2011
♦ 4-6 total killed
♦ 4 civilians reported killed
♦ 2 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Anonymous locals (The NationThe NewsDawn), named relative (New York Times), unnamed officials say the dead are ‘people’ rather than ‘militants’ (CNN)

An attack on a vehicle near Datta Khel in North Wazirtistan killed up to six people and injured two, one critically. A nearby house was also reported to have been partially destroyed in the strike, which occurred just before noon. Although initial reports claimed the men were alleged militants, local media soon challenged this. The Nation cited local people as saying the dead were ‘peaceful tribesmen‘ and not militants. And The News reported that four of the dead were miners from a local chromite mine in the area. It identified one of those killed as Saeedur Rahman, a dealer in chromites. The attack was the first since August 22 in which civilians reportedly died.

In March 2012 the New York Times identified three further civilians killed in the attack as chromite workers Khastar Gul, Mamrud Khan and Noorzal Khan. Noor Magul, a 64-year old farmer from Waziristan and relative of the three, told the paper:

I have revenge in my heart. I just want to grab a drone by the tail and smash it into the ground.

Location: Datta Khel, North Waziristan
References: AFP, Al Jazeera, The Nation, Hindustan Times, SANA, The News, Dawn, Pak Tribune, AP, Voice of America, CNN, Reuters, The News, New York Times, Bureau

Tariq Aziz at Jirga/ Neil Williams/Reprieve

Ob251 – October 31 2011
♦ 2-4 total killed
♦ 2 civilians reported killed (classed as children)
♦ 3 injured
The civilian casualty figures included in this summary are based on the following reports: Named relative (BBC), unnamed villagers (The News), named campaigner (PTIThe Nation) .

An attack on a vehicle and house near the town of Mir Ali, North Waziristan killed up to four alleged militants, according to initial reports. Intelligence officials reported that the house collapsed. The following day reports emerged of two teenagers killed in the attack while traveling in a car, named as Tariq Aziz or Tariq Khan, aged 16 and his cousin Waheed, initially reported to be aged 12. According to Kareem Khan, a campaigner against the drone strikes who himself lost a son in a 2010 strike, Tariq had attended an anti-drone rally in Islamabad just days beforehand. Tariq’s uncle told the BBC:

We condemn this very strongly. He was just a normal boy who loved football.’

In December 2011 ABC News ran a major story on the attack, which raised  questions about the strike: ’A US official acknowledged to ABC News that the car was targeted by the CIA, but said the two people inside it were militants, and that neither occupant was a 12-year-old.’ A video of the boys’ funeral seen by the Bureau shows their photographs on top of coffins, and indicates that Waheed was apparently older than 12 – and was most likely in his mid- to late-teens. ABC News describes the same video:

Pakistanis are seen performing traditional rites of mourning, with two families lined up along two straight lines of chalk drawn on the ground. Two caskets sit on a table with Tariq’s and Waheed’s photos on top of them. At one point, a family member lifts the shroud on one of the bodies to reveal a badly burned torso. The faces of the shrouded bodies are never shown.

Location: Norak, Mir Ali, North Waziristan
References: AP, CNN, Press TV, Dawn, AFP, The News, Pak Tribune, Irna, PTI, The Nation, BBC, Bureau, Bureau, ABC News, Bureau

Ob252 – November 3 2011
♦ 2-3 total killed
♦ 3 reported injured
An attack on an alleged militant housing compound near Miranshah in North Waziristan killed up to three people and injured three others, according to local officials. Dawn reported that the casualties were part of the Haqqani Network.

Location: Darpakhel Sarai, North Waziristan
References: Express Tribune, Reuters, Dawn, AP, Voice of America, AFP, Daily Times, Bureau

Ob253 – November 15 2011
♦ 3-7 total killed
♦ 2-4 reported injured
Drones resumed operations after a 12-day pause to attack a house in the bazaar of Miranshah. Up to seven people were killed, who local Pakistani officials claimed were alleged militants, although reports could not agree on which group they hailed from. AP and The News described the men as belonging to the Pakistan Taliban (TTP). Reuters instead reported that some of those killed were Arabs linked to al Qaeda.

An internal Pakistani assessment of CIA drone strikes only counted three locals killed in this attack, despite official sources putting the body count higher when briefing the media. The document, published by the Bureau in January 2014, was a record of strikes compiled by the local administration’s informants and agents in the tribal region.

Location: Miranshah, North Waziristan
References: AFP, Express Tribune, AP, Xinhua, BBC, Al Jazeera, CNN, Reuters, SANA, Dawn, The News, The News, Frontier Post, Pakistan Observer, The Nation, Bureau

Ob254 – November 16 2011
♦ 4-22 total killed
♦ 6 people reported injured
Two housing compounds reportedly containing ‘local Taliban fighters’ were attacked by as many as five drones at around 2.30 am local time, killing up to 22 people, according to reports. Most of the victims were members of the Pakistan Taliban (TTP), according to reports, and the compounds were run by local commanders Abdul Nasir and Abdul Mukhlis, one or both of whom may have been killed (Xinhua, The News). AFP also reported a local official as saying that some ‘foreigners’ may have died in the attack.

However in January 2014 the Bureau published an internal Pakistani assessment of CIA drone strikes. It listed only four killed in this attack. The data was collected by the local political agents, from information provided them by sources within the tribal agencies. The low total for this strike could be a result of agents providing early casualty assessments and not updating the figures in the record. This is evident in other strikes though the entry of this attack does not make this explicit.

kenan wantedOn May 22 2013 the US Attorney General revealed that a US citizen, Jude Kenan Mohammed, was killed in a Pakistan strike. According to the New York Times, that attack took place in South Waziristan on November 16 2011 and killed around 12 insurgents in a signature strike. According to an open US indictment dated September 2009, ‘On or about October 7, 2008, defendant JUDE KENAN MOHAMMAD departed the united States to travel to Pakistan to engage in violent jihad.’ He was also accused of engaging in ‘planning and perpetrating a Federal crime of terrorism against the united States, citizens and residents of the united States, and their property.’ The New York Times also noted that:

While Mr. Mohammad was not directly targeted, he had come under increasing scrutiny by American counterterrorism officials, who said he was involved in recruiting militants for Al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban, as well as making videos on YouTube to incite violence against the United States.

Mohammed was from Raleigh, North Carolina where local media first reported rumours of his death in February 2012. Described as ‘a vulnerable youth’, he was reportedly introduced to a violent interpretation of Islam by local man William Boyd. Mohammed was alleged to be part of a nine-man terrorist cell in North Carolina before he left for Pakistan. Seven members of the group, including Boyd and his sons, have been convicted of terrorism offenses. The eighth has been arrested in Kosovo.

Location: Babar Ghar, Sararogha, South Waziristan
References: AFP, Radio Free Europe, Associated Press, Express Tribune, Xinhua, Dawn, News Tribe, BBC, The Nation, Pakistan Today, The Hindu, The News, Frontier Post, US Attorney General letter, New York Times, US indictment of Mohammed, Washington Post, New York Times, WRAL, Los Angeles Times, Associated Press, Bureau


Jude Kenan Mohammed’s home-town broadcaster WRAL first reported suspicions of his death in early 2012.

Ob255 – November 17 2011
♦ 7-9 total killed
♦ 3-5 people reported injured
In the third strike in as many days, CIA drones attacked a compound in North Waziristan, killing at least seven and injuring three, according to local officials. Britain’s Channel 4 news reported Pakistani and Taliban officials as saying that four British citizens died in the attack – two named as Ibrahim Adam and Mohammed Azmir Khan. According to the channel:

The four arrived in Pakistan two years ago and had initially associated with al-Qaeda. Later they developed close contacts with the Afghan insurgent group and started fighting against US-led foreign forces in Afghanistan along with Afghan Taliban. They spent some time in Dattakhel and later came to Miramshah, the headquarters of the north Waziristan tribal region.

However The Independent reported that the men were more likely to have died at some point in the previous three months.

The local political administration collected data on CIA drone attacks in an internal strike record. The Bureau published this assessment in January 2014. It listed this strike as killing seven ‘locals’, saying: ‘Amongst the killed, one Noor Wali Khadar Khel Commander of TTP is also included.’

Location: Shawal, North Waziristan
References: AFP, News Tribe, AP, Voice of America, Long War Journal, The Nation, CNN, Dawn, GeoTV, Channel 4 News, The Independent, The Bureau, The NewsUS Attorney General letterNew York TimesUS indictment of Mohammed, Washington Post, Bureau